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Peppermint

Peppermint oil is derived from the peppermint plant -- a cross between water mint and spearmint -- that thrives in Europe and North America.

Peppermint oil is commonly used as flavoring in foods and beverages and as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Peppermint oil also is used for a variety of health conditions and can be taken orally in dietary supplements or topically as a skin cream or ointment.

From: Peppermint Oil WebMD Medical Reference

Antiallergic effect of flavonoid glycosides obtained from Mentha piperita L.

Inoue T1, Sugimoto Y, Masuda H, Kamei C.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11853178?dopt=Abstract

Peppermint oil is derived from the peppermint plant -- a cross between water mint and spearmint -- that thrives in Europe and North America.

Peppermint oil is commonly used as flavoring in foods and beverages and as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Peppermint oil also is used for a variety of health conditions and can be taken orally in dietary supplements or topically as a skin cream or ointment.

From: Peppermint Oil WebMD Medical Reference

Abstract:

Six flavonoid glycosides, eriocitrin (1), narirutin (2), hesperidin (3), luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (4), isorhoifolin (5), diosmin (6), rosmarinic acid (7) and 5,7-dihydroxycromone-7-O-rutinoside (8), were isolated from the aerial part of Mentha piperita L. Among these compounds, compound 4 showed a potent inhibitory effect on histamine release induced by compound 48/80 and antigen-antibody reaction. This compound was more effective than luteolin and luteolin-7-O-glucoside in inhibiting histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. Compound 4 also caused a dose-related inhibition of the antigen-induced nasal response and significant effects were observed at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg. These results indicate that compound 4 may be clinically useful in alleviating the nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

https://www.dietvsdisease.org/peppermint-oil-use-benefits

Peppermint Oil For IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by long-term digestive stress with symptoms like abdominal pain, bloating and changes in stool patterns.

Ingesting peppermint oil is shown to improve symptoms for up to 79% of those with IBS (2).

This 1-month clinical study compared 52 patients taking a peppermint oil capsule 3-4 times per day vs 49 taking a placebo capsule. Neither the subjects nor the researchers knew which patients were receiving which capsule (3).

Of the peppermint oil group:

  • 79% experienced a reduction in abdominal pain
  • 83% had less bloating (distension)
  • 83% had reduced stool frequency
  • 73% had fewer borboygmi (stomach gurgling)
  • 79% experienced less flatulence.

These improvements were dramatically better than the placebo grou

www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/peppermint-oil-uses-benefits-effects#1-2Benefits of Peppermint Oil Several studies suggest that enteric-coated peppermint oil capsules -- which allow the oil to pass through the stomach so it can dissolve in the intestines -- may help relieve common symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome such as abdominal pain, bloating, and gas.


A few studies have found that peppermint oil may help with allergies by inhibiting histamine release (20, 21).

Another study on 77 nursing students found that the use of aromatherapy treatments (including peppermint, lavender, rosemary, etc.) decreased physical and perceived stress responses in just 5 days (22).


Are there harmful drug interactions with peppermint oil?

Before taking peppermint oil, discuss the risks and benefits with your health care provider. Some supplements can interact with medicine. These drug interactions make you sick or render some medications ineffective.

Be cautious about combining peppermint oil with certain drugs because it may inhibit the body's ability to metabolize the drugs and increase the risk of side effects.

From: Peppermint Oil WebMD Medical Reference

PATCHOULI

Patchouli oil is taken from the dried leaves, young leaves, and shoots of a plant called Pogostemon cablin. It is used to make medicine.

People take patchouli oil for colds, tumors, headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. It is also used to treat bad breath, especially bad breath due to drinking alcohol.

In foods and beverages, patchouli oil is used as a flavoring.

In manufacturing, patchouly oil is used in perfumes and cosmetics.

How does it work? Patchouli oil might help fight certain kinds of bacterial and fungal infections.

https://examine.com/supplements/patchouli/Pogostemon cablin,is being investigated for its potential anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties.

Research analysis led by Kamal Patel .

Reviewed by

Examine.com Team Our evidence-based analysis on patchouli features 25 unique references to scientific papers.

Last Updated: Jun 14, 2018Preliminary evidence suggests patchouli can alleviate influenza. It has a moderate effect on most strains of flu, and a powerful effect on the H1N1 strain. Animal evidence suggests patchouli supplementation may also have an anti-depressant effect.

The main bioactive of patchouli is called patchouli alcohol. It can be used to synthesize Taxol, an anti-cancer medicine.

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